Hope is a VERB

Hope is a verb.

It’s not something we have. It’s something we do.

And sometimes it’s one of the hardest verbs—it ranks right up there with endure, persevere, suffer.

Hope is a verb. It's not something we have. It's something we do. Click To Tweet

In the midst of long singleness, we hope for a partner. . . Faced with infertility, we hope for a baby. . . In sickness, we hope for healing. . . When unemployed, we hope for a good job. . . In the face of loss, we hope for gain.

But some choose not to hope.

Often for fear of disappointment.

Disappointment hurts.

So the theory goes: no hope, then no disappointment.

But, at least in my experience, whether I hope or not, I get disappointed. Somehow, disappointment is not in proportion to hope. Disappointment still happens.

A friend a year my senior reached 38 and said she no longer had any hope to get married. She was too old, it wasn’t going to happen, so she decided to quit hoping.

I thought about it. I was only a year younger. Was what she said true? Should I give up on hoping with her? My inner cynic said she was right.

But my youthful hope reminded my inner cynic that hope makes me happy. I am happy when I hope. I enjoy the journey more when I hope.

So, I decided that no matter what happened, even if I lived to 100 and never found a partner, I would hope. I would hope with joy and hope through the pain of disappointment. . . Because I am happy when I hope, as long as my hope is more dependent on the dependable God than the circumstances for which I hope.

I am happy when I hope! Click To Tweet

Jeremiah the prophet was faced with horribly disappointing circumstances; since the leaders hadn’t listened to his words for about forty years, his beloved city was going to be completely destroyed and many of his friends deported. The end was clear. And yet, in the middle of his book, there are words that display profound hoping (chapters 30-33).

And there’s an action, too. Jeremiah bought a field when the market had bottomed out; he made a deposit for future hope. He knew that his city would be restored, and, hoping, he bought a field at a time when it would be crazy to hope.

Sometimes, I’m crazy like Jeremiah, making deposits for future hope. Are you? What kind of deposits have you made?

Hope is a verb.

Hope with me, to enjoy the journey together!

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